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PostPosted: Sun Dec 10, 2006 3:10 pm 
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Hi all,



My wife, my daughter and me will move as soon as next summer to Bodrum, most likely to live there.



Navigating the Web, we found this useful site and this forum with a lot of kind people.



Our only concern is about our daughter. She is 14, she was born in India and she joined our family at the age of 6. We feel she is excited about all that, but at the same time she has some fear about the language and the possibility to find there some friends.



If you have children, can you tell us how they accepted the new community and how the community received them?



Moreover, starting with meeting some friends, even in this virtual space, makes us more confident for our future in Bodrum



Many thanks,

Isotta, Sonia & Luigi



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2006 4:11 pm 
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Quote Maenad:

"I wish you all the best and hope you have a wonderful new life in Turkey. I would point out a couple of things:



Firstly, I think you will get better info if you give this forum a little more info about your daughter. Has she ever had contact with Turks? Are you going to put her in an international school, or a Turkish one?



Secondly, depending on where you come from, your daughter may find it very odd to see the way that people come and go in Bodrum. It's such a tourist town that "norms" are very different. Is your daughter used to the idea of tourists?



Thirdly, if you are Indian 'looking', Turks are generally very open-minded but I think you will definitely encounter some low-level racism. I don't know how much - I lived in Turkey for 2 years five years ago - but you will definitely see it a little. Think about it in advance - you don't want it to shock you.



good luck and have a wonderful time!"

=======================



Hi, we are all Italian, even if my daughter is Indian, and of course she looks like an Indian!



And you, where do you come from? (if I can ask you that, of course).



As per the schools, we will see the situation downthere.



We live near Rimini, and I do not think we lack of experience about tourism ;-)



Any more info is wellcome.

Nice time, Luigi



=============

p.s. Please follow this topic by clicking Post replay button. Do not use New Topic, thanks.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 12, 2006 4:31 pm 
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Good morning,



I read the topic

http:\www.mymerhaba.com/en/forum/display_topic_threads.asp?ForumID=14&TopicID=2838&PagePosition=1

about moving to Istanbul.



It seems that some people suggested to decide after taking into consideration the reality of the country, instead of the impression someone can have from a month of tourism there. And this sounds ok. Other comments instead, made me doubtful about the reliability of the answers: I live in Italy since 1954 and apart from "out of order" rest rooms, it is well known that Italian toilets are the most pleasant e well equipped in the world (unfortunately I must also confess that the public ones are often soiled :-( ).



At this point I really would like to know if what it is said in the other topic (about Istanbul) can also be applied to, let's say, Bodrum, a big city well prepared to welcome tourists from all over the word.

Many thanks,

Luigi



=============

some of the issues of the other topic:

1) I just spent two weeks in a hospital in Izmir, and was simply appalled at everything. My mother in law was ill, and i was staying with her, unfortunately we lost her. But I learned one thing: I HOPE TO GOD I DONT GET SICK HERE.



2) I have a daughter who is now 24 and I know if I had told her that we were moving to Turkey when she was a teenager I would have had a riot on my hands



3) ...It is also easier to find your way around in e.g. Marmaris, Fethiye, Bodrum etc. espescially with no language skills....



4) and...the cost of living is a hell of lot more than it is in states...... the only thing cheaper here is the fresh fruits and vegetables, otherwise its very expensive......

well...it is in bodrum anyway......



5) As for what you are planning to do, I am baffled that you would consider this move at such a crucial time in your aughter's life, believe me, it wasnt easy for my daughter, and it wont be for yours, there will be lots of resentment, and she will throw it in your face at every turn. I was able to help her with hr homework, cause i spoke turkish, but how will you help your daughter? hOw will she get along with her peers if she cant communicate with them?



6)... i agree with the previous post that turkey is only good for vacations. i've been here for 5 months....



7) ...you would be a target for getting ripped off on anything and everything. Even my husband is Turkish, when we moved into our apartment it took ages just to get a phone..





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PostPosted: Tue Dec 12, 2006 5:02 pm 
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Hi,

Welcome to Bodrum.

Me and my family settled in Bodrum after 23 years in Australia (I was born in Turkey).(I look Indian! very! and half the population of Turkey looks Indian! the other half looks Anglo-saxon!)

As you already know, Bodrum is a cosmopolitan town (the peninsula).

I dont agree with Luigi that you may face "low-level racism". certainly there may be some Politically Motivated discrimination if you are into that sort of thing but no racism (as you and you daughter will definately be subjected to in England, Italy, etc). Don't worry there are people from all over the world in Bodrum. Of course initially your child may feel alienated because of language barrier and cultural differences but you will soon discover that infact Turkish kids do like to meet and try to communicate with your daughter in their little English(she will soon become popular as the new kid in town!). I have an 12 year old and she adjusted in a few months. her Turkish improved and now she plays volleyball in the school team! (we've been here 2 years)

There are also various organisations, groups etc. to help you. We live in Gumusluk and there are about 800 "migrants" in this town alone :). Some have children and are getting along well... Also there is a English language newspaper (Bodrum Observer) you can find on the internet for any querries you may have.



Please do contact me when you arrive. We would like to help you settle smoothly (as will many other Bodrumers do).

Dogan sahin


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 12, 2006 5:07 pm 
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:) I correct the beginning of Paragraph three (I dont agree with Luigi..) it shouldve been " I dont agree with Maenad"



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 12, 2006 5:25 pm 
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Hi Dogan,

very pleased to "meet" you!



After the reading of the other topic I got in total discouregement.



You are very kind and I will take the freedom to ask you some more information (I will write again after office time, this evening).

Nice time, Luigi



=========

B.T.W. are you a translator? in such a case, we are colleagues!



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 12, 2006 9:59 pm 
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About 80 visits and only 2 answers (both from people of Turkish origin).

Well, something to think about.

Luigi


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 13, 2006 3:16 pm 
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Hi Luigi

Now that I know you are following up I can expand on the subject a bit more.

By the way, I am glad that we are colleagues for it shall be easier to cut short finer details.

Previously, I have mentioned that "Half of Turkey looks Indian..". I think half India looks Turk and the other half Italian :). Ottoman Empire ruled greater part of India at the time of Islamic expansion (events start 12th century onwards .Re: Taj mahal/Babur Shah). As such, Indian people have an inherent connecetion with Islamic countries. Thus, the continuing connections with India, p**istan, Bengladesh, Indonesia, Malaysia and other pacific nations. Islam forbids racism. Turkey has been the flag bearer of Islamic Law until the decline of Ottoman Empire and collapsed in 1920. Over 80 years experience in Republican System, the present Citizens ( past "servants" of the Sultan) do not know of the Concept of Racism based on skin color. The Empire ruled many countries all the way from the East to the west, from the South to the north and had had to accept and rule people of many races.

The present citizens of Turkey are the 3rd or fourth generation grandchildren of people (from all countries of Ottoman rule and I can count many) who warred against British/French Imperialism and took refuge in Turkey.

Alas, you will be one of the Citizens and you have chosen the Heaven to settle(Bodrum indeed is a heaven for those who seek to find the the peace of mind everybody strives to).

You haven't mentioned which town you will be settling to but, from my experience and small scale research I can say that each town has a certain type of people ..

Yalikavak and Bitez are said to be good for families with children because of the climate, protected bays and quieter and easy going lifestyles (not to mention the many restaurants from world cuisine). Each of the bays in both settlements have been known for their protective waters.

Gumbet is for ravers, youth, bar crashers etc.. Turgutreis, I really cant say anything but there are so many Irish and English there that you could easily start to feel you are in Notthing Hill markets on the weekends...Golturk buku is for Turkish jet set. Gumusluk is for art minded, secluded, keeping to themselves , bohemian, poor, aspiring, ambitious, expectatious, free thinking intellectuals and would be intellectuals alike. Mumcular, Guvercinlik I don't know :)...

I hope this cleared up your mind a bit.

As to the questions raised in your mind: yes, hospital system is not up to scratch but what is health insurance for ? (there are many private hospitals of world class). As to work opportunity (translators always find work ). Expenses: petrol is expensive so you get a gas tank fitted in your car and its much cheaper!. Vegetables and fruit are cheap ( precisely. you have the opportunity to eatm more vegetables than fat increased products or cholestrol ridden processed meat). And I hope no one gets sick in anywhere (its bad!). I worked in the largest research hospitalþ in the southern hemisphere for a year and (melbourne) I know how hard it is to be a sick person.

....

2) I have a daughter...(I know you have told your daughter about this brave move to Turkey! Luigi)



3) ...It is also easier to find your way around in e.g. Marmaris, Fethiye, Bodrum etc. espescially with no language skills....( I agree)



4)

5)

6)... i agree with the previous post that turkey is only good for vacations. i've been here for 5 months.... ( Well, no one could say NO to half year in Turkey and Half year in Europe..I wouldn't if I had earned enough money)



7) ...you would be a target for getting ripped off on anything and everything. Even my husband is Turkish, when we moved into our apartment it took ages just to get a phone.. ( telephone system is privatised and the share holders are, funnily enough, Europenas who came here to improve the system!:)



If you would like to write my email is: [email protected],com





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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 13, 2006 8:40 pm 
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Out of curiosity Luigi, if I may ask, why are you considering leaving bella Italia?.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 13, 2006 9:24 pm 
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Yes Disco, you are right!



We must live near the sea for health problems with my little Sonia and our job with multinationals is paid just as 13 years ago, but life costs are now 4 times more :-(

I could add a lot of other reasons. Anyway, it is also about the fact that we are starting to be very skeptical about the supposed 1st world advanced civilisation as it is commonly intended today....



Let me know your considerations about that.

Ciao, Luigi


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2006 6:45 pm 
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WOW!

more than 170 visits!



Thanks to all for the support.



Luigi





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PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2006 8:57 pm 
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Quote: Originally posted by translator on 13.12.2006

Hi Luigi

Now that I know you are following up I can expand on the subject a bit more.

By the way, I am glad that we are colleagues for it shall be easier to cut short finer details.............






Hi, you have mail

ciao :-)

Luigi



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PostPosted: Sun Feb 25, 2007 8:14 am 
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Hi Luigi:



I have been living on and off in Bodrum for 10 years and I have never witnessed anything coming anywhere close to racism in Turkey. What I would say is that most Turks prefer Turkish food and most do not like foreign cuisine. Also it would be true to say that most Turks do not speak a foreign language, which is common among former colonial powers. But neither of those characteristics qualify for being a manifestation of "low level racism".   


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2007 8:07 pm 
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We moved to Yalikavak from Edinburgh last year with our 10 year old son Christopher and he started at the local school, the Turkish children have been great with him and really helped him settle. There are another 8 british kids at the school now aswell and I have to say its a far better life for children here.



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 Post subject: Re: Moving to Bodrum, soon
PostPosted: Sun Oct 05, 2008 4:31 am 
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Hello, I am a very new member here so probably my answer will be very late for you. First of all, welcome to Bodrum. You will enjoy living here. I am an English and Host Country teacher who have taught at some national, international and bilingual schools for 27 years. For almost 2 years I have been living in Bodrum and running Turkish to foreigners classes here with the course books I wrote. As you may have already learnt there is only one private school here, the rest are state schools. This school will definitely not fulfill the educational, social and pschological needs of your children. It is a very classical, national kind of a trade center that is far behind the new global developments educational wise. They ignore the international and bulingual body within the school community. If you send your children there, they will end up learning Turkish well but lose their own national identity, language and culture. We have thought about opening an international and bilingual school here but unfortunately couldn't find anybody to support our project financially. Please do not hesitate to get in touch with me if you need any kind of help. Good luck.


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